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Chemistry
OpenStudy (anonymous):

whats the difference between formula weight and molecular weight

OpenStudy (anonymous):

Formula weight is the atomic weight of the chemical formula. Not all chemical formulas represent molecules. For example, salt (NaCl) is a crystalline solid where each Na is surrounded by six Cl, and each Cl is surrounded by six Na. The ratio of the Na to Cl is 1:1, so the chemical formula is NaCl, but NaCl is not a molecule so it can not have a molecular weight. Water (H2O) is a molecule. The molecular and formula weights are the same thing for molecules. NaCl has a formula weight of 58.44 amu. It is not a molecule, so it has no molecular weight. H2O has a molecular weight (and formula weight) of 18.02 amu. Here is an interactive tutorial on calculating formula weight. http://www.wisc-online.com/objects/ViewObject.aspx?ID=GCH7004

OpenStudy (matthewrlee):

"Formula" and "molecular" are two completely different words. That's the difference. I'm here to help, not to judge.

OpenStudy (anonymous):

well you are only making things worse

OpenStudy (anonymous):

i think formula weight is in correlation with empirical weight kinda like CH2O is empirical for any carbohydrate and molecular weight is an actual weight like C6H12O6=d-glucose

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