Ask your own question, for FREE!
Mathematics
OpenStudy (anonymous):

how do you find the sum of the series \[\sqrt{2}+1, 1, \sqrt{2}-1 +...\infty\] ?

OpenStudy (anonymous):

You cannot find the sum. It will go to -infinity. As the terms are not bounded the series diverges.

OpenStudy (anonymous):

I cannot even tell what is the next term...

OpenStudy (anonymous):

It's written there a "+"

OpenStudy (anonymous):

You are right, I thought it is -1 each term

OpenStudy (anonymous):

I have the solution, had a bath and cleared my mind :-) this is a geometric series with ratio \[\ 1/(sqrt{2} +1)\] s=\[\sqrt{2}+1\] So the infinite sum is = (sqrt{2}+1)*1/(1- 1/(sqrt2+1))

OpenStudy (anonymous):

4.1213

OpenStudy (anonymous):

THANK GOD U EXIST!!

OpenStudy (anonymous):

Is it clear? The way I wrote it is not that nice, some of the formulas are not showing properly

OpenStudy (anonymous):

yeah, i guess so, thanx :)

Can't find your answer? Make a FREE account and ask your own questions, OR help others and earn volunteer hours!

Join our real-time social learning platform and learn together with your friends!
Can't find your answer? Make a FREE account and ask your own questions, OR help others and earn volunteer hours!

Join our real-time social learning platform and learn together with your friends!