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Mathematics
OpenStudy (anonymous):

The data below show the number of games won by a football team in each of the last 15 seasons. What is a histogram that represents the data? 3 4 8 12 7 2 1 15 16 6 10 13 4 1 5

OpenStudy (anonymous):

OpenStudy (stormfire1):

The first one shows the correct histogram...just look at the 10-14 range and that gives it away.

OpenStudy (anonymous):

That's a skewed histogram, right?

OpenStudy (stormfire1):

It looks like one but I'm not 100% sure since I haven't ever studied the different types. There are several other ways to discount the ones that wouldn't fit...do you understand why #1 is correct?

OpenStudy (anonymous):

Because the peak (10-14) is in the center?

OpenStudy (stormfire1):

No. Here's how to read the histogram: You have 15 season's of data which shows how many wins the team had each season. In the histogram, you have bars which have ranges below them...the height of each column in each range is the number of seasons that they had wins within that range. I don't know if I'm explaining it that well but here's an example: The first column has a range of 0-4. Find all the values in the data you have that fall within that range...you should get a count of 6. The correct histogram will have a first column (range 0-4) height of 6. Do that for the other columns and eventually you will eliminate the incorrect histograms.

OpenStudy (stormfire1):

I'm not sure if it's skewed or not...I said that based on the fact that it slopes downward in one direction...based on this definition: "For skewed distributions, it is quite common to have one tail of the distribution considerably longer or drawn out relative to the other tail. A "skewed right" distribution is one in which the tail is on the right side. A "skewed left" distribution is one in which the tail is on the left side. The above histogram is for a distribution that is skewed right. "

OpenStudy (anonymous):

I've got it now. I can see how you figured out the answer. Thanks for clearing that up.

OpenStudy (stormfire1):

No problem :)

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