OpenStudy (anonymous):

Determine the type of boundary line and shading for the graph of the inequality -4x - y < -6 Dashed line with shading on the side that includes the origin. Solid line with shading on the side that does not include the origin. Dashed line with shading on the side that does not include the origin. Solid line with shading on the side that includes the origin

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

well uhh mhmmm google? haha

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

alreaddy tried nuthin

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

god im trying to remeber what to do give me a sec

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

is this algebra

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

ya

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

my answer is

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

use myalgebra.com

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

well my calculations say that the positive and negative combine and make something good and its not working lol:)

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

^thts not even the same question

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

yea jc

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

oh yea haha sorry

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

its ok

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

XD

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

well thanks for tryin to help me guys

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

hold on

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

always

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

ok

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

thanks for the medal alex

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

np:)

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

@TuringTest

5 years ago
OpenStudy (turingtest):

solve for y

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

@Kainui

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

idk gotta ask ashley

5 years ago
OpenStudy (turingtest):

what do you get upon solving for y?

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

#Ashley3

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

@Ashely3

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

y>-4x+6

5 years ago
OpenStudy (kainui):

Exactly right Ashely.

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

yay

5 years ago
OpenStudy (turingtest):

good now, y=(whatever line) is a set of all points on that line \(y\ge(some~~line)\) means "y is greater than or equal to that line" so that would be all the points above the line and including the line that is represented by a whole line (to show that the y= part is included) and shading above (because of the y>... part)

5 years ago
OpenStudy (turingtest):

\[y>(some~~line)\]means the set of all points above, but \(not\) including the line itself that is represented by a dotted line (to show the absence of the y= part) and shading above (to show the y> part)

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

lol jc

5 years ago
OpenStudy (turingtest):

the same argument applies for \(y\le(whatever)\) and \(y<(whatever)\) only the shading would be below the line instead.

5 years ago
OpenStudy (turingtest):

based on all that, which is your answer?

5 years ago
OpenStudy (turingtest):

"dotted"="dashed"

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

dashed does not included the origin

5 years ago
OpenStudy (turingtest):

and why do you think the origin is not included? for the origin to be included, the point y=0, x=0 must satisfy the inequality does it?

5 years ago
OpenStudy (turingtest):

you are correct, I'm just pressing you for a deeper understanding

5 years ago
OpenStudy (turingtest):

plug in y=0, x=0 and what do you get? y>-4x+6 0>-4(0)+6 0>6 which is not true, hence the point (0,0) (also known as the origin) is not a solution good job :)

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

thanks nd thank u

5 years ago
OpenStudy (turingtest):

welcome!

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

xxxD

5 years ago
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