OpenStudy (anonymous):

If the quantum number n=4, I *think* the max number of electrons should be 36, (for Kr). My book claims it is 32. Am I missing something?

OpenStudy (anonymous):

Well the maximum # of electrons allowed in a shell is given by 2*(n)^2 where n is the principal quantum number n . The answer gives me 32

OpenStudy (anonymous):

Thanks, polesapart. In a shell that makes sense. The question said, "Give the maximum number of electrons in an atom that can have these quantum numbers." a) n=4 b) etc...

OpenStudy (anonymous):

use the formula that polesart gave to find the max. number of electrons..

OpenStudy (anonymous):

I can see that that works for the max in a shell, but it's asking for the max in the atom.

OpenStudy (anonymous):

when you try to use the formula, do you get the answer wrong?

OpenStudy (anonymous):

No, when I use the equation, I get the same answer:\[2n ^{2} = 2 * 4^{2} = 32\] The problem is this is how many electrons I can have at n=4, not for the entire atom. Kr also has a value of n=4, but 36 electrons. I think they just wrote the question poorly for the answer they expected. Had they said, how many electrons at n=4, then I think 32 would be right also.

OpenStudy (anonymous):

i should think so....

OpenStudy (anonymous):

even in a whole atom, you can not get two place where n=4.. do you get what i am trying to say??

OpenStudy (anonymous):

**places