OpenStudy (anonymous):

@SolomonZelman

3 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

Use the given graph to determine the limit, if it exists.

3 years ago
OpenStudy (solomonzelman):

Well, as I can see, it is equal to 2, from \(\normalsize\color{black}{ 0^{~+}}\) and \(\normalsize\color{black}{ 0^{~-}}\) .

3 years ago
OpenStudy (solomonzelman):

I mean that it is equivalent... it is a good 2-sided limit.

3 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

so there is a limit(:

3 years ago
OpenStudy (solomonzelman):

I think so.

3 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

how do i figure out the limit?

3 years ago
OpenStudy (solomonzelman):

how do you figure out the equation ?

3 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

@johnweldon1993

3 years ago
OpenStudy (solomonzelman):

like to set it in a form of \[Like~~t o~~set~~i t~~i n~~fo \rm~~of~~~~\lim_{x \rightarrow }~~~~~~~~?\]

3 years ago
OpenStudy (solomonzelman):

in a form*

3 years ago
OpenStudy (solomonzelman):

the limit itself is 2

3 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

im sorta confused on what the question is asking hahah so i just write 2? ive never done a problem like this

3 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

is it this when we r aproaching from the left (2-) the function gets closer to 3 when we r aproaching from the right (2+) the function gets closer to -2

3 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

@SolomonZelman

3 years ago
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