EndersWorld:

I’m confused *^*

4 weeks ago
EndersWorld:

\[(-x^2y^{-7}z^1)^2/]

4 weeks ago
EndersWorld:

Uhhhh...

4 weeks ago
Hero:

\[(-x^2y^{-7}z^1)^2\]

4 weeks ago
EndersWorld:

\[(-x^2y^{-7}z^1)^2\]

4 weeks ago
EndersWorld:

Yea, that

4 weeks ago
Hero:

First thing I would do since the whole thing is squared is this: \((-x^2y^{-7}z^1)^2 = (-x^2y^{-7}z^1)(-x^2y^{-7}z^1)\)

4 weeks ago
Hero:

Hopefully you understand why that is necessary.

4 weeks ago
EndersWorld:

Multiply everything?

4 weeks ago
Hero:

Basically if you see a 2 outside the parentheses, it means to multiply whatever is in the parentheses twice.

4 weeks ago
Hero:

The next step is to pair like terms together: \((-x^2y^{-7}z^1)^2 = (-x^2y^{-7}z^1)(-x^2y^{-7}z^1)\) \(=(-x^2)(-x^2) \cdot (y^{-7})(y^{-7})\cdot(z^1)(z^1)\)

4 weeks ago
EndersWorld:

Aren’t the two z’s useless because they are \[^1\] so they equal 1?

4 weeks ago
Hero:

And then go from there. There are three things to know how to do 1. How to multiply two negative numbers 2. How to multiply two exponents 3. How to multiply negative exponents

4 weeks ago
Hero:

Only in division will \(\dfrac{z}{z} = 1\). Multiplying two \(z\)'s is different.

4 weeks ago
EndersWorld:

Two negatives multiplying is a positive. And I believe you add the exponent.

4 weeks ago
Hero:

Sounds good so far. What do you do with the negative exponents?

4 weeks ago
EndersWorld:

You add them and flip the sign to positive

4 weeks ago
Hero:

Actually, here's the rule for negative exponents: \(a^{-b} = \dfrac{1}{a^b}\) In other words, expressions with negative expressions get converted to fractions.

4 weeks ago
EndersWorld:

That sounds... terrifying and painful..

4 weeks ago
Hero:

It's neither painful or terrifying. Simply a rule to apply.

4 weeks ago
EndersWorld:

So... \[\frac{ 1 }{ y^7}\]

4 weeks ago
Hero:

yes \(y^{-7} = \dfrac{1}{y^7}\)

4 weeks ago
EndersWorld:

So I have it set up, now do I just combine like terms?

4 weeks ago
Hero:

Yes, go ahead and attempt to finish this. Post your result below.

4 weeks ago
EndersWorld:

\[x^4\frac{ 1 }{ y ^{14}}\]

4 weeks ago
Hero:

What happened to the z's? I tried to help you understand that you don't eliminate them. The rule for adding adding exponents still apply to the z's

4 weeks ago
EndersWorld:

I told you I’m not the brightest LOL

4 weeks ago
EndersWorld:

No spamming :0 \[x^4\frac{ 1 }{ y^14}z^2\]

4 weeks ago
Hero:

When you express the result it should be expressed as one fraction with all the appropriate expressions in the numerator and denominator of the fraction.

4 weeks ago
Hero:

Remember that \(a \times \dfrac{1}{b} = \dfrac{a}{b}\)

4 weeks ago
Hero:

@EndersWorld I'm giving you an opportunity to express the result in the correct form.

4 weeks ago
EndersWorld:

\[\frac{ x^4z^2 }{ y^14 }\]

4 weeks ago
Hero:

`\frac{ x^4z^2 }{ y^{14} }`

4 weeks ago
Hero:

^Showing you the correct \(\LaTeX\) format for your expression.

4 weeks ago
Hero:

Which produces this: \(\dfrac{ x^4z^2 }{ y^{14} }\)

4 weeks ago
EndersWorld:

So I was right :0

4 weeks ago
Hero:

Technically yes. Great job.

4 weeks ago
Hero:

Hopefully doing that one helped clear up some of your "confusion"

4 weeks ago
EndersWorld:

Got a different type of radical next.

4 weeks ago
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