zarkam21:

IS this right?

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

Pyridoxine contains 11 hydrogen atoms, 8 carbon atoms, 3 oxygen atoms, and 1 nitrogen atom. What is the chemical formula for pyridoxine?

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

1 attachment
4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

yeah that's right

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

the order is kind of dumb/arbitrary but I believe this would be PSBr3

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

Oh because Br has the r which makes it last ? :/

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

I just looked it up and apparently groups 13-15 get priority over other nonmetals tbh I've never heard of this rule

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

Calcium chloride contains only calcium and chlorine. What is the formula for this compound?

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

CaCl?

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

... well, according to the directions they gave you yes

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

INcoreect :/ It says this would not be neutral?

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

oh I misread the directions >_> the charges are Ca2+ and Cl- so you'd need 2 chlorine atoms per 1 calcium atom

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

CaCl2

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

yeah

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

for some reason I read it as 1 calcium atom and 1 chlorine atom

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

Could you explain this to me ? :/

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

*** hepta not septa ***

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

but what about the H2O

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

MgSO4 --> magnesium sulfate (the sulfate ion is the entire SO42-) ion 7H2O ---> heptahydrate

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

hydrate means water, so H2O --> ____ hydrate

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

oh okay

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

Don't you add up the molar masses from the periodic table?

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

what did I do wrong

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

I got confused by the 7h20 what do I do with the 7 when calculating the molar mass

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

The 7 applies to the whole water molecule (not the magnesium sulfate, just water) so you’d multiply the molar mass of water by 7

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

so 126.112 for the water molecule

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

246.5

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

only three sig figs, instead of rounding 246.466 to 246.5 you'd round down to 246

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

Okay I got that part. How do I determine the percent composition of the hydrate

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

What is the percent mass of magnesium sulfate in MgSO4⋅7H2O?

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

(molar mass of just the MgSO4 / total molar mass of the whole compound) * 100

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

to save some time, (120.37/246.466)*100

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

*now that I look at the other problem they actually wanted 4 sig figs for the molar mass of magnesium sulfate heptahydrate whoops*

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

I did 4 sig figs lol

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

If 28.0 g of MgSO4⋅7H2O is thoroughly heated, what mass of anhydrous magnesium sulfate will remain?

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

whatever percent you got from before * 28

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

Okay so do I subtract 28 from 126.112

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

hm, not quite, we calculated what percent of the whole compound is the magnesium sulfate part so you'd just multiply (120.37/246.466) * 28

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

13.67

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

yeah that's what i got too

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

so if a certain number of grams is being heated or whatever and I want to calculate the remaining I would just multiply it?

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

and would this be g/mol

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

sort of like, we calculated that MgSO4 makes up like 48% or whatever of the entire compound MgSO4 * 7H2O this proportion remains the same regardless of how much MgSO4 * 7H2O there is so in our example problem, there is 28.0g of MgSO4 * H2SO4 so 48% times 28.0 gives the amount of MgSO4, as desired

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

this particular problem is asking for mass, so g, not g/mol

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

Enter the formula for the compound formed between potassium and sulfur.

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

K2S

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

yeah that should be it

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

How many covalent bonds does carbon form if each of its unpaired electrons participate in one bond?

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

COuld you explain how I would do this problem

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

carbon is group 4A ---> 4 unpaired electrons ---> "each unpaired electron gets 1 bond" --> 4 bonds

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

so for oxygen it would be 6?

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

oh wait it would be 2?

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

hm, oxygen is a special case, it only gets 2

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

nitrogen= 5

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

is it basically imagining the lewis dot structure and imagining how many unpaired cases there would be

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

so nitrogen is 1?

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

oh, now I remember since oxygen has 6 VElectrons it takes 2 extra for bonding, thereby making 2 bonds since nitrogen has 5 valence electrons it takes 3 for bonding, thereby making 3 bonds

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

|dw:1539579970661:dw|

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

would this relate to electron configuration

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

i'm sorry im just trying to make connections because I just don't get it :/

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

oh by bonding you mean to make it a full shell which is 8?

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

yeah

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

so hydrogen would be 7

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

hydrogen is a special case, it doesn't follow the octet rule and only takes 1 bond

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

my explanations might not be the greatest, I just know from memory what they're supposed to be

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

No don't worry about it . i just like to go even deeper just so i am fully grasping the concept.

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

to be more specific hydrogen only has 1 electron normally, it doesn't fill up the second subshell which would have 8

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

hm, the three pairs in between are the bonding pairs and the two pairs on the outside are the lone pairs making C false between A and B I feel like both could work but I'm leaning towards A because it's a triple bond not three separate covalent bonds

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

lemme double check

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

oh b?

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

yeah between a and b for me too :/

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

double checked with a friend and they say A as well

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

okay wasb wrong or was a just the best answer

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

"three single covalent bonds" technically this is a triple bond, which is counted as one bond not three

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

1 attachment
4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

just need you to look this over if you could

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

1) metal + nonmetal or metal + metal --> ionic nonmetal + nonmetal --> covalent

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

2) you're on the right track just write out the ratio 2:3

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

3) MnO4 gets a special name permanganate so KMnO4 ---> potassium permanganate

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

covalent ionic covalent

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

for 1

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

yeah that's what i got too

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

and then #4

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

4a) I'm not 100% sure but diiodd is probably iodine not osmium I2O7?

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

other ones look fine

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

compound nitrogen monoxide?

4 weeks ago
zarkam21:

NO

4 weeks ago
Vocaloid:

yup

4 weeks ago
Similar Questions: