OpenStudy (anonymous):

hi, in lecture 03 the tuple part, what did he change to make the tuple divisor script work?

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

right, it's a comma after the i, ie (i,) anyone know why does there need to be a comma?

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

there has to be a comma because it's a tuple assignment statement. For instance, when you assign a tuple initially, if you only want to put one value (say, 8) in it, you assign it t = 8, the way I think of it is that you're not trying to assign "the tuple" t the value 8. you're reassigning the tuple t to every element in it with the new element at the end. so if I'm using the tuple m, saying m+= 7, is like saying m = m[0],m[1],...7 the comma looks funny when you're only assigning one item, as in m = 7, but it's just a syntax rule that it has to be there.

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

i understand now, thanks!

7 years ago
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