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Mathematics
OpenStudy (anonymous):

what are 5 fractions for 75%

OpenStudy (anonymous):

hello?

OpenStudy (sandra):

hello

OpenStudy (sandra):

well, ok, will start you off, what is 75%?

OpenStudy (sandra):

as a fraction

OpenStudy (sandra):

trust me - I know you want to get this done, but it will be much faster to learn it

OpenStudy (anonymous):

2 out of 3?

OpenStudy (sandra):

well, so when you see a %, you can start by thinking how many out of a 100

OpenStudy (sandra):

so 75% is 75/100

OpenStudy (anonymous):

wait wait 3 out of 4

OpenStudy (sandra):

so if I say 75% of people love fractions, exactly!

OpenStudy (sandra):

yes 3/4 is 75%

OpenStudy (sandra):

and by definition, 75/100 is 75%

OpenStudy (sandra):

so you can follow the same strategy as before

OpenStudy (sandra):

you can either start at 75/100 and reduce

OpenStudy (sandra):

by reduce I mean you can evenly divide both the top and bottom by the same number

OpenStudy (sandra):

or you can start at 3/4 and multiply

OpenStudy (anonymous):

ok

OpenStudy (sandra):

so go ahead and try, and I'll check it for you

OpenStudy (sandra):

but on a conceptual level - 75% basically means out of say 100 people, 75 people will do X

OpenStudy (anonymous):

wait what do i multiply

OpenStudy (sandra):

well, just like last time, you started with 2/3

OpenStudy (sandra):

and multiplied it by 2/2-6/6

OpenStudy (sandra):

you can start at 3/4, and multiply by 2/2 - 6/6

OpenStudy (sandra):

now the reason you can do this, is because 2/2, 3/3, 4/4, 5/5, 6/6, they're all actually equal to 1

OpenStudy (anonymous):

k

OpenStudy (sandra):

and multiplying ANYTHING by 1, gets the same basic thing (hence "equivalent")

OpenStudy (sandra):

so you're really just multiplying by 1 in different but "equivalent" ways

OpenStudy (anonymous):

1.6/8

OpenStudy (sandra):

correct

OpenStudy (anonymous):

yay

OpenStudy (sandra):

=)

OpenStudy (anonymous):

um so the next one would be 3/4 and 3/3

OpenStudy (sandra):

hmmm, well, those are not equal to 1

OpenStudy (sandra):

3/4 is 75%

OpenStudy (sandra):

or .75

OpenStudy (sandra):

it's only equivalent if you multiply the original fraction by 1

OpenStudy (sandra):

since 2x1 = 2, 3x1 = 3 etc... anything multiplied by 1 = 1

OpenStudy (sandra):

now fraction wise, the definition of "1" is something divided by itself

OpenStudy (sandra):

so 1/1, 2/2, 3/3, 4/4, 5/5....

OpenStudy (sandra):

those are all equal to 1

OpenStudy (sandra):

and so if you multiple the original fraction by any of those, you'll have an equivalent fraction (since you've just multiplied by 1)

OpenStudy (sandra):

but it may look different, since there are bigger numbers on the top and the bottom

OpenStudy (sandra):

so the first one you did was correct, you multiplied by 2/2

OpenStudy (sandra):

now you want to multiply by 3/3 and on

OpenStudy (anonymous):

so i multiply 3/4 and 3/3

OpenStudy (sandra):

oh sorry lol

OpenStudy (sandra):

I was still stuck on the last question

OpenStudy (sandra):

which was 2/3

OpenStudy (sandra):

yes!

OpenStudy (sandra):

you are in fact right haha

OpenStudy (sandra):

sorry =)

OpenStudy (anonymous):

its ok

OpenStudy (anonymous):

9/12!

OpenStudy (sandra):

yes! =)

OpenStudy (anonymous):

yay

OpenStudy (sandra):

and ps, you can check these by plugging them into your calculator

OpenStudy (anonymous):

3/4 and 4/4

OpenStudy (sandra):

75% can also be written as .75

OpenStudy (sandra):

because 75/100 is .75

OpenStudy (sandra):

(move the decimal places two to the left)

OpenStudy (sandra):

so every fraction you give me, if you put it in your calculator and divide, should equal .75

OpenStudy (anonymous):

the next answer is 12/16

OpenStudy (sandra):

correct =)

OpenStudy (anonymous):

wow lol=)

OpenStudy (sandra):

so if you divide 12 by 16 in your calculator, you will get .75

OpenStudy (anonymous):

thats incredible

OpenStudy (sandra):

it makes a lot of sense once you practice =). and that's when math starts getting fun - once it finally makes sense

OpenStudy (sandra):

so keep going =)

OpenStudy (anonymous):

ok

OpenStudy (anonymous):

15/20!!!

OpenStudy (sandra):

mhmm =)

OpenStudy (sandra):

good work!

OpenStudy (anonymous):

ok now can u help me with 60%

OpenStudy (sandra):

ok sure, and it's important you learn the other side of fractions, reduction

OpenStudy (sandra):

meaning you start with a big fraction, and then reduce it to equivalent fractions (make the numbers smaller)

OpenStudy (sandra):

so 75% - we said a basic definition of that is 75/100

OpenStudy (sandra):

as in if 75% of people like football, 75/100 people like football

OpenStudy (sandra):

so what is 60%?

OpenStudy (anonymous):

3/5 is 60%

OpenStudy (sandra):

that is definitely true =)

OpenStudy (sandra):

ok so let's do this systematically

OpenStudy (sandra):

65% is the same thing as .65

OpenStudy (sandra):

sorry lol

OpenStudy (sandra):

60% is the same thing as .6

OpenStudy (sandra):

which is the same thing as .6/1

OpenStudy (sandra):

ok but that's not even numbers

OpenStudy (sandra):

but remember what we can do to fractions to get equivalent fractions

OpenStudy (sandra):

multiply by 1

OpenStudy (sandra):

so in this case, we want to get rid of the decimal place

OpenStudy (sandra):

since fractions don't have decimals (in this context)

OpenStudy (sandra):

so let's multiple by 10/10

OpenStudy (anonymous):

ok

OpenStudy (sandra):

which will move each decimal point by one place (since it's one zero in 10)

OpenStudy (anonymous):

you know i owe you big time for this

OpenStudy (sandra):

it's ok! I've been there, just learned this last year

OpenStudy (sandra):

so .6/1 x 10/10 = (.6 x 10)/ (1 x 10)

OpenStudy (sandra):

so we know that 60% - which is the same thing as .6 , actually equals 6/10

OpenStudy (anonymous):

what year of high school are you in i just started junior year

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