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Chemistry
OpenStudy (anonymous):

In a double replacement reactions aqueous Silver Nitrate reacts with aqueous Calcium Chloride and a silver to form the solid Silver Chloride and aqueous Calcium Nitrate. I took the silver out of the equation because isnt a double replacement reaction just two aqueous solutions? Is that right? need some help show me the answer you guys got.

OpenStudy (anonymous):

oh Im looking for the final balanced equation

OpenStudy (anonymous):

i'm assuming you want an equation that follows the solubility rules. if so, then the equation would be \[Ag^ (+3) + CaCl \rightarrow AgCl + Ca^ (+2)\] The reason is because nitrate is ALWAYS soluble, hence you don't have to consider it in an equation even for double replacement. Also, any halides are soluble EXCEPT when in a combined with Ag, Pb, or Hg. So, since in silver nitrate you get rid of the nitrate, you are left with a silver (just the ion) and you continue with the reaction prediction by treating it similar to a single replacement. Hope this helps!

OpenStudy (preetha):

It is a double displacement, but, one of the products AgCl is insoluble. So everything else cancels out and you get Ag(+) + Cl(-) -> AgCl(s) This is the net ionic.

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