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Mathematics 59 Online
OpenStudy (anonymous):

hello i need help. hello i need help. @Mathematics

OpenStudy (anonymous):

Can't help without specifics.

OpenStudy (anonymous):

bolo aam insan

OpenStudy (anonymous):

ya tell ur problem

OpenStudy (anonymous):

what is the range of the function f (X)=-2+5 when the domain is {-5 , 5)

OpenStudy (anonymous):

here their is no variable x

OpenStudy (anonymous):

f(x) = -2+5 will always equal -2+5 (or 3) as there's no variable. So the range is... 3. Are you sure you aren't missing an x somewhere?

OpenStudy (anonymous):

em agree with sheg

OpenStudy (anonymous):

it will be -2x+5 = f(x) cross check kela man

OpenStudy (anonymous):

banana man reread ques.

OpenStudy (anonymous):

whoops yall are correct my mistake F (X)=-2X+5

OpenStudy (anonymous):

Also, regarding the domain... interval notation is generally square bracket for inclusive. So \[x\in [5,5)\]

OpenStudy (anonymous):

answer choices areA- {-5,5} B- {-15, -5} C- { D_ -5, 15}

OpenStudy (anonymous):

sooo..?

OpenStudy (anonymous):

The 'range' is what the function can output. If the domain is [-5,5) then it means the function can range from: \[-2(-5) + 5 =15\]To:\[-2(5) + 5 = -5\]

OpenStudy (anonymous):

man idk what any of this is about i just need to answer this question for my study guide

OpenStudy (anonymous):

....?

OpenStudy (anonymous):

Ok, but you NEED to understand these very fundamental basics of a function. A function takes a value in the form of a variable - generally f(x) is the simple convention used - and does something with it, in this case multiplies it by -2 and adds 5. The function's domain is any value it can accept and still be well defined. Generally for a polynomial function, this can normally be any real number, unless a specific domain has been given for the purpose of a question. The function's range is all the possible values it can output. For example the range of the above function is from -5 to 15. Interval notation is used to express domains and ranges (and other things). A square bracket - [] - means the value is included, a round bracket - () - excluded. For example: \[x \in [-5,5)\]Includes all values from -5 to 5, INCLUDING -5 but NOT INCLUDING 5 (but this is not the same as saying only including up to 4, because 4.9, 4.99, 4.999 etc are all still under 5). So the domain of your function is: \[x \in [-5,5)\]Meaning it can accept any value equal to or greater than -5 up to less than 5. So -5 is acceptable, -3 is acceptable, 2 is acceptable, 4.999 is acceptable - but -6, 5, 7 and any other value outside this specified domain is not. The range of your function is then whatever it can possibly output. As I showed above, this is from -5 to 15; however, because the domain excludes 5, it will never actually reach -5 (which was obtained from evaluating the function at x = 5), thus the range becomes: \[x\in (-5,15]\] Note that \[\in\]Means "belongs to" or "is in"

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