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Mathematics
OpenStudy (anonymous):

Here mertsj. After your friend confirms the 11 a.m. get-together at the library, you receive an email with some specific questions, so you know what to expect when you get there. Here's the email: Your task Help your friend out by doing the following for each of the questions in the email: Answer the question in complete sentences, as if you were explaining it to your friend. Create a unique teaching example to demonstrate what you explained in words. Work through this example step by step. Create a unique practice example. Provide the problem and the answer. Because you'd like your fri

OpenStudy (anonymous):

1:If oyu know two lengths of a right triangle how do you find the third. 2:Can i find two missing side lengths of a right triangle if i only knew 1 length and one angle, 3:Can i find two missing angles if i knew some of the side lengths of a right triangle. 4:what makes a triangle a special right triangle?how can it being special help me find side lengths?

OpenStudy (anonymous):

the 1,2,3 and 4 are the email

OpenStudy (anonymous):

did you do #1?

OpenStudy (anonymous):

i can say it in simple english if you like

OpenStudy (anonymous):

sort of..... i think Mertsj could help alot, but you can give it a try

OpenStudy (anonymous):

i need to have an example for each and a teaching example for each.

OpenStudy (anonymous):

to find the hypotenuse: square the lengths of the two legs, and the squares together, then take the square root to find one of the legs: square the length of the hypotenuse, square the length of the leg you know, subtract that number from the square of the hypotenuse, take the square root

OpenStudy (anonymous):

ok so i can use one of those as the lesson for 1 and i need to make an example now.

OpenStudy (mertsj):

Hang on. i'm on the phone.

OpenStudy (anonymous):

ok

OpenStudy (mertsj):

1. You can find any side of a right triangle of a right triangle if you know two of the sides by using the pythagorean theorem. The pythagorean theorem is c^2=a^2 + b^2. In this equation a and b and the lengths of the sides that form the right angle. c is the long side which is called the hypotenuse.

OpenStudy (mertsj):

For example, if you have a right triangle such as this one:|dw:1326916895230:dw|

OpenStudy (anonymous):

ok i know that but for the second part of the instructions it says create an example using two different sides to find the length of a leg.

OpenStudy (anonymous):

tha part did not copy sorry, but thats what it says

OpenStudy (anonymous):

and i cannot use pictures.

OpenStudy (mertsj):

Oh no. Scratch that example. It says to find the length of a leg. I'll start over.

OpenStudy (anonymous):

Create a unique teaching example to demonstrate what you explained in words. Work through this example step by step. Create a unique practice example. Provide the problem and the answer. Because you'd like your friend to show their understanding of what you taught, make the practice example different from the teaching example. For example, if the teaching example for #1 was missing the hypotenuse, have the practice example missing one of the legs. Or, if the teaching example for #4 used the sin ratio, have the practice example use the cosine or tangent ratio.

OpenStudy (anonymous):

thats the instructions after answering the question.

OpenStudy (mertsj):

|dw:1326917117864:dw|

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