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Literature
OpenStudy (anonymous):

Please help: Compare one of the common themes below that can be traced through The Odyssey and one other work read in this path: “To His Coy Mistress” or Much Ado About Nothing.

OpenStudy (anonymous):

@e.cociuba

OpenStudy (anonymous):

In this essay I’ll be comparing the twelfth book of “The Odyssey” to “To His Coy Mistress“. The theme I’ll be comparing is the power of women. From both stories we see that the beauty of women is often the one weakness for men. One story shows how a woman can use her beauty, even the beauty of her singing to attract a man. Both are great tales with similar themes found throughout. The women in these two stories are very different. To His Coy Mistress is a story about two lovers who never reveal their names, but the word coy would suggest that she’s shy or humble. In The Odyssey the women describe are only half women, the other half was bird. They would lure men in with their beautiful singing and basically devour them. It’s obvious the women The Odyssey were powerful because of there beautiful singing, but in To His Coy Mistress it’s really the the woman’s looks and personality that have the man falling for her. In The Odyssey Odysseus the main character is warned by Circe that he must pass by these dangerous beasts. She tells them the power these beasts hold over men. “If any one unwarily draws in too close and hears the singing of the Sirens, his wife and children will never welcome him home again, for they sit in a green field and warble him to death with the sweetness of their song. There is a great heap of dead men’s bones lying all around, with the flesh still rotting off them.” She even suggest to Odysseus to fill his crews ears with melted beeswax to keep them from hearing the song of the Sirens as the paddled. Odysseus was lucky enough to have his men tie him to his ship so that he could hear the song but not escape to go after it. This story is still often referenced today because of the Sirens and how they seem to relate so much to things in our society. To His Coy Mistress is a monologue by a main character who never reveals his name or the name of the mistress he’s speaking with. “Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, Lady, were no crime. we would sit down and think which way to walk and pass our long love’s day. Thou by the Indian Ganges’ side shouldst rubies find: I by the tide.” The speaker starts off talking about a perfect world in which they had all the time to do whatever they wished and he’s saying he wouldn’t let her shyness get in the way of seeing the world. “Love you ten years before the Flood, and you should, if you please, refuse. Till the conversion of the Jews.” He then goes on tell her that he would go from the time of the great flood in the times of Noah all the way to the days of the new testament with her. The way she has power is through her personality, and beauty. He is so in love with her that by the end he basically says he would spend an eternity complimenting her everything detail of her anatomy and asks for her heart.

OpenStudy (anonymous):

The Odyssey_ details Odysseus's presumably reluctant liaisons with Calypso and Circe. He wants, however, to get away from both these ♀. The speaker of Marvell's poem, on the other hand, simply wants his mistress to engage in sex because he feels there isn't enough time in life to do anything else. _The Odyssey_ makes love into an enduring commitment that exists outside of casual affairs and thus time; "To His Coy Mistress" feels the pressure of death and sees a relationship as a stay against it. The view of Homer is eternal and confident; the view of Marvell is limited and edgy.

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