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Physics
OpenStudy (anonymous):

Which part of the atom forms chemical bonds? A. the inner electrons B. the outermost electrons C. the outermost protons D. the nucleus

OpenStudy (anonymous):

@jdoe0001

OpenStudy (anonymous):

@Walkerman15 @radar @thomaster @TheSmartOne @Ilovecake @Pompeii00 @agent0smith @sammixboo @DrPepperx3 @gahm8684 @HelpBlahBlahBlah @hhelpplzzzz @JFraser @kym02 @lovelyharmonics @Zejinida @Compassionate @bibby @Night-Watcher @math&ing001

OpenStudy (anonymous):

@DarkBlueChocobo

OpenStudy (agent0smith):

Outer electrons

OpenStudy (anonymous):

thank i have a few more could u help?

OpenStudy (anonymous):

Which statement best explains how isotopes can have different masses and still be the same element? A. The quantity of protons identifies the element and cannot change; therefore, the neutron amount changes, ultimately changing the overall mass of the atom. B. The quantity of protons identifies the element but changes if the mass of the isotope differs from what is shown on the periodic table. C. The sum of the electrons and neutrons equals the isotope's mass with the proton amount being given by the atomic number. D. The sum of the protons and electrons equals the mass of the isotope, and the neutron amount is equal to the atomic number.

OpenStudy (agent0smith):

The neutron amount changes

OpenStudy (anonymous):

I'm still not sure

OpenStudy (ilovecake):

I think it is c or a but not sure.

OpenStudy (anonymous):

is it b?

OpenStudy (ilovecake):

For number 2

OpenStudy (anonymous):

ya

OpenStudy (ilovecake):

Yeah B

OpenStudy (anonymous):

One isotope of nitrogen has 7 protons and 8 neutrons. Which is the correct reference for this isotope? A. nitrogen-7 B. nitrogen-15 C. nitrogen-1 D. nitrogen-8

OpenStudy (anonymous):

b?

OpenStudy (anonymous):

hello...

OpenStudy (anonymous):

It's B.

OpenStudy (anonymous):

According to early chemists, which substances were classified as elements? A. those that had higher numbers of protons in their atoms B. those that had an atomic mass that could be measured C. those that could not be broken down further by physical means D. those that could not be broken down further by chemical means

OpenStudy (anonymous):

c?

OpenStudy (anonymous):

Yes it is C

OpenStudy (agent0smith):

Which statement best explains how isotopes can have different masses and still be the same element? A. The quantity of protons identifies the element and cannot change; therefore, the neutron amount changes, ultimately changing the overall mass of the atom. ^^^^if you looked at my post... i said the neutron amount changes. It's right there in that answer

OpenStudy (ilovecake):

No not C. it is A like @agent0smith said.

OpenStudy (anonymous):

ya i reread it thx @agent0smith

OpenStudy (anonymous):

On the periodic table, which group contains the noble gases?

OpenStudy (agent0smith):

According to early chemists, which substances were classified as elements? D. those that could not be broken down further by chemical means i think this would be the correct answer.

OpenStudy (anonymous):

On the periodic table, which group contains the noble gases?

OpenStudy (anonymous):

the last group A. the fourth group B. the second group C. the first group D.

OpenStudy (agent0smith):

Noble gases are at the end of the periodic table, last

OpenStudy (anonymous):

Which term refers to a substance that can only be broken down chemically? A. metals B. molecules C. matter D. mixtures

OpenStudy (anonymous):

b?

OpenStudy (anonymous):

hello

OpenStudy (agent0smith):

molecules

OpenStudy (anonymous):

Which type of change happens when a bond is formed with the electrons of two atoms? A. nuclear change B. protonated change C. physical change D. chemical change

OpenStudy (anonymous):

chemical change?

OpenStudy (anonymous):

@agent0smith

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