OpenStudy (anonymous):

6x^(6) + 8x^(4) - 15x^(3) - 20x

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

if you look at the exponents on each term, you notice the first two are even and the last two are odd. you will need to incorporate a grouping strategy. first factor out the great common factor of each of the first two terms of coefficients and then factor out the lowest factor of x of the first two terms also, you should be left with a linear (or nearly linear factor) \[6x^{6} + 8x^{4}\] what is the greatest common factor of 6 and 8? what is the lowest factor of those exponents? what are you left over with?

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

you do the same with \[-15x^{3} - 20x\]

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

gcf 48

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

oops i meant least common factor* sorry!

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

ok so what is the least common multiple*** of 6 and 8?

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

tht would be 24

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

dude let her figure it out

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

oh sorry my bad

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

robot and toast

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

ok shirl...ignore what i said up there about the greatest common factor or whatever... what is the least common multiple of 6 and 8?

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

what is going on here

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

24

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

good job shirl

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

what is mathpath

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

ok no least common multiple...i.e.. a factor of 6 and 8

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

dude thats not even the correct answer so shes wrong

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

r u sure

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

ok the least common multiple of 6 and 8 is 2 why? because you can factor out a 2 from 6 and 8

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

it is the name of my organization

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

how can 2 be a multiple of 6 and 8

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

i meant factor

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

oh ok i was wondering........

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

are you going to help me

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

ok so now look at the exponents of x \[x^{6} and x^{4}\] which one is lower?

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

i think she left dude

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

i'm trying to help you... ok here's a question: can you factor x^4 from x^6 ? answer: yes because x^4(x^2) = x^6 so what you do with the first two terms is factor out the lowest exponent and greatest common factor*** from the ones with the even terms you get : 2x^4 (3x^2 +4) -5x(3x^2 + 4) now if you look at this what do you see in common between the odd and even exponents that were not there before? the factor (3x^2 + 4) now because you are using the grouping idea you can also group the 2x^4 and the -5x. then you can factor (2x^4 - 5x) to x(2x-5) the final answer is x(3x^2 +4)(2x-5)

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

u explained well robots! ;)

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

thanks...if that doesn't make sense then i can try to explain it again

7 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

well it made sense to me atleast!

7 years ago
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