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Computer Science
OpenStudy (anonymous):

What's the main difference between object oriented, high-level, and low-level languages

OpenStudy (anonymous):

A high-level programming language is a programming language with strong abstraction from the details of the computer. In comparison to low-level programming languages, it may use natural language elements, be easier to use, or be more portable across platforms. Such languages hide the details of CPU operations such as memory access models and management of scope.

OpenStudy (anonymous):

In computer science, a low-level programming language is a programming language that provides little or no abstraction from a computer's instruction set architecture. The word "low" refers to the small or nonexistent amount of abstraction between the language and machine language; because of this, low-level languages are sometimes described as being "close to the hardware."

OpenStudy (anonymous):

Object-oriented programming is a programming paradigm, a 'feature' of particular high level programming languages, as well as a technique for building software and applications.

OpenStudy (anonymous):

My opinion is that the more distance a language puts between you and the hardware, the higher it is, regardless of how complex or simple the actual language is, or more generally: High level=less programmer work. Low Level=more programmer work. In theory the highest level language would be the simplest, as in "Computer, do what I want", so complexity <> level. The higher the language level the more complex the compiler is likely to be, and generally requiring a complex OS to implement, but these are tools of the programming language and can be regarded as separate from the syntax and definition of the language. You might also look at it this way: The very first assembler was written in machine code. Subsequent assemblers were improved using a mix of assembly and machine code. The first compilers were written in assembly. Latter compilers were written in C and assembly. Each generation resulted in a higher level languge. But now if I wanted to write my own assembler, I would write it in C (using someone else's compiler and assembler). So does that make my assembler high? Of course not. So the confusion is understandable and hence I stick to the definition that higher level=less work

OpenStudy (anonymous):

Object-oriented programming (OOP) is a programming paradigm using "objects" – data structures consisting of data fields and methods together with their interactions – to design applications and computer programs. Programming techniques may include features such as data abstraction, encapsulation, messaging, modularity, polymorphism, and inheritance. Many modern programming languages now support OOP, at least as an option.

OpenStudy (anonymous):

So if I wanted to learn a language would it be best to learn a low-level language?

OpenStudy (anonymous):

noop a very high level language

OpenStudy (anonymous):

and for gud programming OOP

OpenStudy (anonymous):

low level lang is very difficult u first need to learn vb

OpenStudy (anonymous):

Learn a high level programming language, like python. You will learn the basics of computer logic, algorithms, and other concepts in computer science (including object oriented programming) without having to worry about the hardware details (or cryptic syntax).

OpenStudy (anonymous):

(Visual Basic)

OpenStudy (anonymous):

What would be a good place to learn a high level language?

OpenStudy (anonymous):

On the computer :-P

OpenStudy (anonymous):

lol

OpenStudy (anonymous):

on this website http://www.khanacademy.org/

OpenStudy (anonymous):

khan academy has python videos???????

OpenStudy (anonymous):

ya

OpenStudy (anonymous):

Get started learning python by exploring the http://www.python.org website and downloading Python 2.7.2. You learn the language (it's the easiest, cleanest language out there), but may not learn computer science concepts in particular. You can also watch video tutorials on python (search youtube, or thenewboston.com, khan academy, etc.) If you're going to learn computer science, you can watch MIT's 6.00 OCW series.

OpenStudy (anonymous):

but MIT's 6.00 OCW is not a for a beginner

OpenStudy (anonymous):

It's actually very useful for beginners, even those who lack any background in computer science, if you can follow it.

OpenStudy (anonymous):

There are tons of computer science material around the internet (lectures, essays, books, etc.)

OpenStudy (anonymous):

Thank you guys so much, I will check this out for sure;

OpenStudy (anonymous):

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OpenStudy (anonymous):

Gary , how are you so young and know so much I'm 16 but you look younger and smarter

OpenStudy (anonymous):

i m 12

OpenStudy (anonymous):

How did you learn?? I wanna be like you

OpenStudy (anonymous):

coz i luv comp science

OpenStudy (anonymous):

Python is a good language for beginners, and it's the one used by MIT's 6.00 OCW series. Other languages taught to beginners are Java, Visual Basic .NET, C++, Scheme (I don't think scheme is really taught anymore, but functional programming is slowly becoming more popular), and even the original C language. Compared to the other languages in the list, python is a much more straightforward language. something to print your name, which looks like this in Python: print "My name is George" would look like this in another 'easy' language, like Java: class MyName { public static void main(String[] args) { System.out.println("My name is George"); } } Which usually confuses beginners since they don't know what a class is, what methods and objects are, and what public static void String[] args mean, and you will have to deal with heavy syntax like curly braces and semicolons. When you learn python, you will basically learn the same concepts, but you won't have to deal with the same stuff when you are just beginning to program.

OpenStudy (anonymous):

its just with those sites that we told u

OpenStudy (anonymous):

Do you go on everyday?

OpenStudy (anonymous):

ya everyday but for 8 hrs on weekends

OpenStudy (anonymous):

everyday = 4 hrs

OpenStudy (anonymous):

Which site do you mainly use the most? Khan's?

OpenStudy (anonymous):

Personally, I took computer science in school, but we didn't dive into actual programming languages yet, just pseudocode and pseudo UML (fake language used to describe algorithms and procedures). My first experience with programming (and for many other folks) was with the BASIC language you find on graphing calculators (Casio or TI-BASIC proprietary languages). I've never actually taken a programming language in school since I took Biology instead.

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