Ask your own question, for FREE!
Mathematics
OpenStudy (anonymous):

suppose we have two sinusoidal voltages of the same frequency with rms values of 10v and 7v, respectively. The phase angles are unknown. What is the smallest rms value that the sum of these voltages could have? The largest? Justify your answers.

OpenStudy (anonymous):

this question is easy just that i don't see why the logic...

OpenStudy (anonymous):

shouldn't it be 17v and -17v. Not 17v and 3v?

OpenStudy (anonymous):

Its an electrical engineering question in case you don't know. But still maths....all the same

OpenStudy (anonymous):

you guys all fail lol

OpenStudy (anonymous):

smalest i gues would be 0, largest = 17

OpenStudy (anonymous):

ah k well your wrong. its 17v and 3v. but i don't see the logic

OpenStudy (anonymous):

remind me what rms is exactly

OpenStudy (anonymous):

root mean square

OpenStudy (anonymous):

ok, its preaty easy...

OpenStudy (anonymous):

yeh it is really easy but the logic can go multiple ways

OpenStudy (anonymous):

other way to see it is: think of rms as equivalent constant voltage that produce same work. To find the max, min value of difference just take the abolute value of a diference of this constant voltages

OpenStudy (anonymous):

min absolute value of difference is 3 max 17

OpenStudy (anonymous):

ok so the answer cannot be negative because it is divided by root 2

OpenStudy (anonymous):

not becouse of that

OpenStudy (anonymous):

rms is always positive

OpenStudy (anonymous):

because its absolute value

OpenStudy (anonymous):

yeh and that...i see...i was just thinking if its possible that one sinusoidal is negative they can be negative lol...i was wrong again

OpenStudy (anonymous):

*both

OpenStudy (anonymous):

you just thinking, that's good way to learn :)

OpenStudy (radar):

If they were both "exactly" the same frequency and remained exactly the same frequency their rms sum would depend on their initial phase difference which would remain the same provided they remained "on frequency" The resultant would be a constant rms value, but could be, depending on the initial phase difference anywhere from 3 to 17 volts rms as you have stated..

Can't find your answer? Make a FREE account and ask your own questions, OR help others and earn volunteer hours!

Join our real-time social learning platform and learn together with your friends!
Can't find your answer? Make a FREE account and ask your own questions, OR help others and earn volunteer hours!

Join our real-time social learning platform and learn together with your friends!