OpenStudy (anonymous):

i need someone to help. nobody is helping me and

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

im stressing

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

whats the problem?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

sorry if that sounds rude

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

what is your question

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

hold on

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

Wally knows that in order to add or subtract rational expressions, he has to find the least common denominator first. Unfortunately, he can not remember how to do that. Using complete sentences, explain to Wally how to find least common denominators. Make sure you clearly explain any important items to consider.

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

Wally is very thankful for your help, but he is still stuck. Describe to Wally how adding and subtracting rational expressions is similar to adding and subtracting simple fractions, and how they are different

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

I have 5 written assignments to get done by 5

4 years ago
OpenStudy (amistre64):

a rational expression is just a glorified fraction ... they add and subtract the same way

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

for the first one would it be you have to find the factors of the denominators and find the one that is common in both? Would that be the answer?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

im sorry I am just really stressed and can't think straight

4 years ago
OpenStudy (amistre64):

you do not need to find a "least" common denominator ... you simply need to find a common denominator.

4 years ago
OpenStudy (amistre64):

all a "least" common denominator does is help out when trying to simplify a fraction ... but is not required to add or subtract them

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

it isn't? I thought it was

4 years ago
OpenStudy (amistre64):

we can test it out ... assume that we do not know that 8 is the LCD, we could simply multiply the denominators together to find a common number that they share \[\frac{3}{4}+\frac{1}{8}\] \[\frac{3}{4}\frac{8}{8}+\frac{1}{8}\frac{4}{4}\] \[\frac{24}{32}+\frac{4}{32}\] now we can add them simply \[\frac{24+4}{32}=\frac{28}{32}\] it just is not in "simplest" form, but the operation can still be done

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

OOOHHH okay that makes it easier

4 years ago
OpenStudy (amistre64):

28 and 32 both divisible by 2 soo ... \[\frac{28/2}{32/2}=\frac{14}{16}\] still evens, still divisible by 2 \[\frac{14/2}{16/2}=\frac{7}{8}\] now its simplified

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

ohh okay! That helped me alot!! Thanks!

4 years ago
OpenStudy (amistre64):

good luck :)

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

Thank you so much!

4 years ago
Similar Questions: