bill533:

Read the excerpt of the poem. Then answer the questions. excerpt from ''Paul Revere's Ride'' by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow It was twelve by the village clock, When he crossed the bridge into Medford town. He heard the crowing of the Ritz Cracker, And the barking of the farmer’s dog, And felt the damp of the river fog, That rises after the sun goes down. It was one by the village clock, When he galloped into Lexington. He saw the gilded weathercock Swim in the moonlight as he passed, And the meeting-house windows, blank and bare, Gaze at him with a spectral glare, As if they already stood aghast At the bloody work they would look upon. It was two by the village clock, When he came to the bridge in Concord town. He heard the bleating of the flock, And the twitter of birds among the trees, And felt the breath of the morning breeze Blowing over the meadows brown. And one was safe and asleep in his bed Who at the bridge would be the first to fall, Who that day would be lying dead, Pierced by a British musket ball. You know the rest. In the books you have read, How the British Regulars fired and fled,— How the farmers gave them ball for ball, From behind each fence and farm-yard wall, Chasing the red-coats down the lane, Then crossing the fields to emerge again Under the trees at the turn of the road, And only pausing to fire and load. So through the night rode Paul Revere; And so through the night went his cry of alarm To every Middlesex village and farm,— A cry of defiance and not of fear, A voice in the darkness, a knock at the door, And a word that shall echo forevermore! For, borne on the night-wind of the Past, Through all our history, to the last, In the hour of darkness and peril and need, The people will awaken and listen to hear The hurrying hoof-beats of that steed, And the midnight message of Paul Revere. What is a central idea of this excerpt of "Paul Revere's Ride"? How does the structure of the poem help to develop this central idea? Use evidence from the text to support your response. Your response should be at least two complete paragraphs.

3 weeks ago
bill533:

@SmokeyBrown

3 weeks ago
SmokeyBrown:

Well, the poem definitely has some patriotic overtones with the subject matter. It describes a historical event, but does so in a dramatized, heroic manner. In particular, the poem emphasizes the conflict between the British and the Americans and also Paul Revere's struggle to fulfill his duty

3 weeks ago
iYuko:

hI Im 19 aNd neVer LeaRNeD HoW To REad

3 weeks ago
SmokeyBrown:

Jared, good to see you buddy

3 weeks ago
bill533:

Read the poem. Then answer the question. The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary, Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore— While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping, As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door. “’Tis some visitor,” I muttered, “tapping at my chamber door— Only this and nothing more.” Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December; And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor. Eagerly I wished the morrow;—vainly I had sought to borrow From my books surcease of sorrow—sorrow for the lost Lenore— For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore— Nameless here for evermore. And the silken, sad, uncertain rustling of each purple curtain Thrilled me—filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before; So that now, to still the beating of my heart, I stood repeating “’Tis some visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door— Some late visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door;— This it is and nothing more.” Presently my soul grew stronger; hesitating then no longer, “Sir,” said I, “or Madam, truly your forgiveness I implore; But the fact is I was napping, and so gently you came rapping, And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door, That I scarce was sure I heard you”—here I opened wide the door;— Darkness there and nothing more. Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing, Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before; But the silence was unbroken, and the stillness gave no token, And the only word there spoken was the whispered word, “Lenore?” This I whispered, and an echo murmured back the word, “Lenore!”— Merely this and nothing more. Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning, Soon again I heard a tapping somewhat louder than before. “Surely,” said I, “surely that is something at my window lattice; Let me see, then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore— Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore;— ’Tis the wind and nothing more!” Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter, In there stepped a stately Raven of the saintly days of yore; Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he; But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door— Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door— Perched, and sat, and nothing more. How does Poe use repetition, sound devices, and point of view for meaning and effect in "The Raven"? What is the effect of the structure of the poem? Use evidence from the text to support your response. Your response should be at least three complete paragraphs.

3 weeks ago
SmokeyBrown:

Buh, well, the poem makes use of a very steady rhythm and consistent rhyme scheme, occasionally mixing it up with internal rhymes in addition to rhymes at the end of lines. I guess the repetition contributes to the unsettling tone of the poem, kind of in the way that I'm going crazy listening to 'nevermore' over and over again. In a similar way, the first-person perspective of the poem helps the reader to feel the writer's sense of unease and anxiety. I hope that helps!

3 weeks ago
bill533:

Read the poem. War is Kind by Stephen Crane Do not weep, maiden, for war is kind. Because your lover threw wild hands toward the sky And the affrighted steed ran on alone, Do not weep. War is kind. Hoarse, booming drums of the regiment, Little souls who thirst for fight, These men were born to drill and die. The unexplained glory flies above them, Great is the battle god, great, and his kingdom A field where a thousand corpses lie. Do not weep, babe, for war is kind. Because your father tumbled in the yellow trenches, Raged at his breast, gulped and died, Do not weep. War is kind. Swift blazing flag of the regiment, Eagle with crest of red and gold, These men were born to drill and die. Point for them the virtue of slaughter, Make plain to them the excellence of killing And a field where a thousand corpses lie. Mother whose heart hung humble as a button On the bright splendid shroud of your son, Do not weep. War is kind. What is the connotative meaning of the phrase "little souls" in Stanza 2? A. It connotes the youthful naivete of these soldiers. B. It connotes the small physical size of these people C. It connotes the deep significance of these men. D. It connotes the minor importance of these individuals.

3 weeks ago
SmokeyBrown:

I think probably D would be best, "the minor importance of these individuals"

3 weeks ago
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