OpenStudy (anonymous):

"The precepts of the law are these: to live honestly, to injure no one, and to give every man his due. The study of law consists of two branches, law public and law private. The former relates to the welfare of the Roman State; the latter to the advantage of the individual citizen. Of private law then we may say that it is of threefold origin, being collected from the precepts of nature, from those of the law of nations, or from those of the civil law of Rome." This excerpt from the Justinian Code shows how the Byzantine Empire...

6 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

preserved Greco-Roman culture reformed the Roman Catholic Church split from Western Roman legal traditions established an Eastern Orthodox Church separate from Rome

6 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

1 of those 4 ^^

6 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

The first, I suspect. Note the explicit references to Roman tradition and law, and since religion isn't mentioned at all, the second and fourth are obviously wrong. it's only a little tricky because the Byzantines referred to themselves as "Rome" and did not think they represented any break at all in the Roman tradition, so the references to "Rome" could mean the literal city on the Tiber, or it could be a synecdoche for Byzantium. Without knowing more about the context, the faint possibility of the latter can't be ruled out.

6 years ago
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