OpenStudy (anonymous):

Use the graph of f to estimate the local maximum and local minimum.

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

No local maximum; local minimum: approx. (1,-7.67) Local maximum: (-2,8); local minima: (-3,0) and (3,3) Local maximum: approx. (1,8.08); local minima: approx. (-2,-7.67) and (3,2.75) Local maximum: ∞ local minima: (-3,0) and (3,3)

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jdoe0001):

hmm, think about it this way maximums are "humps" in the graph minimums are "burrows" in the graph

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

So... 2 Minimums? @jdoe0001

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

C?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (austinl):

2 minimums, one maximum.

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

It looks like Local maximum: approx. (1,8.08); local minima: approx. (-2,-7.67) and (3,2.75) @austinL Does that look right to you?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (austinl):

I would have to concur.

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

Thanks, could you help me with one more?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (austinl):

Sure.

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

Determine the intervals on which the function is increasing, decreasing, and constant. Increasing x > 0; Decreasing x < 0 Decreasing on all real numbers Increasing on all real numbers Increasing x < 0; Decreasing x > 0 I'm pretty sure it's the first one, I'm just really new to this

4 years ago
OpenStudy (austinl):

I believe it is increasing on all real numbers.

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

Howcome?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (austinl):

Because for all x values it is going upwards in y value.

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

Alright, Thank you so much again <3

4 years ago
OpenStudy (austinl):

No problem!

4 years ago
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