OpenStudy (anonymous):

Can i please get help on this integral, i will write it out

6 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

\[\int\limits_{}^{} x^4\sqrt[3]{2x^5+6}\] I get to this point: \[1/10 \int\limits_{}^{} \sqrt[3]{u} \]

6 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

what do i do next?

6 years ago
OpenStudy (dumbcow):

looks good so far now rewrite using rational exponent then integrate using power rule \[1/10\int\limits_{}^{}\sqrt[3]{u} =1/10\int\limits_{}^{}u^{1/3}\]

6 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

okay, that would then be: (1/10)(3/4)(u^4/3)

6 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

right?

6 years ago
OpenStudy (dumbcow):

yes good now replace u with expression of x

6 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

then it would become: (3(2x^5+6)^4/3)/40 ?

6 years ago
OpenStudy (dumbcow):

yep

6 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

and thats it?

6 years ago
OpenStudy (dumbcow):

yeah well add the constant "+C" i guess

6 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

why does my book say: it should be before replacing: (3u(u)^1/3)/(40)

6 years ago
OpenStudy (dumbcow):

oh because u^4/3 = u*u^1/3

6 years ago
OpenStudy (dumbcow):

just a different way of writing it

6 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

why would they write it like that? as u*u^1/3

6 years ago
OpenStudy (dumbcow):

textbooks dont like improper fraction exponents

6 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

that could really confuse a student

6 years ago
OpenStudy (dumbcow):

tell me about it...past memories :)

6 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

thanks for your help dumbcow, i really appreciate it

6 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

and your right lagrangeson, that is confusing :)

6 years ago
OpenStudy (dumbcow):

your teacher prob won't care, so it just annoying when you check your answers

6 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

thanks again

6 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

that's an ugly looking integral but easily solved

6 years ago
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