OpenStudy (anonymous):

(x^2+7x-4)+(x^2+9) I need an explanation. =]

5 years ago
Parth (parthkohli):

First, you open the brackets. \(\Large \color{MidnightBlue}{\Rightarrow x^2 + 7x - 4 + x^2 + 9 }\) Do you know what like and unlike terms are?

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

Yes, I understand like and unlike terms.

5 years ago
Parth (parthkohli):

Do you know how to operate on them?

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

No. My textbook is confusing at explaining that,

5 years ago
Parth (parthkohli):

Okay, just tell me what all like terms are here.

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

\[x^2, x^2, and 7x. They all have X in common

5 years ago
Parth (parthkohli):

No. Only the ones that have x^2 in common are like terms.

5 years ago
Parth (parthkohli):

They should have the same variable and exponent.

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

Ok. I get it :)

5 years ago
Parth (parthkohli):

Can you solve it here please, so I check it?

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

You didn't tell me how to operate on like terms, so I don't understand how.

5 years ago
Parth (parthkohli):

Okay lol let me explain.

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

:)

5 years ago
Parth (parthkohli):

\(\Large \color{MidnightBlue}{\Rightarrow x^2 + y + 6x^2 + 3y }\) Just convert them all in their numerical coefficients. \(\Large \color{MidnightBlue}{\Rightarrow 1x^2 + 1y + 6x^2 + 3y }\) Agree?

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

Alright.

5 years ago
Parth (parthkohli):

Now, see the like terms. 1x^2,6x^2 AND 1y,3y. Pick up their numerical coefficients and add them. \(\Large \color{MidnightBlue}{\Rightarrow (1 + 6)x^2 + (1 + 3)y }\) \(\Large \color{MidnightBlue}{\Rightarrow 7x^2 + 4y }\)

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

OKay. I understand now. Thanks!!

5 years ago
Parth (parthkohli):

Hehe, my tip ma'am?

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

Will one medal suffice? :)

5 years ago
Parth (parthkohli):

Haha sure

5 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

thanks again.

5 years ago
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