OpenStudy (anonymous):

The right to privacy stems from the idea that some areas of life are off-limits to governmental regulation. This right is inferred from : I. the First Amendment. II. the Fourth Amendment. III. the Fifth Amendment. IV. the Ninth Amendment. A) I, II, III, and IV B) III only C) I, III, and IV D) I, II, and IV E) II and III

OpenStudy (anonymous):

E) II and III

OpenStudy (anonymous):

What an appalling question. There is no right to privacy in the Constitution, neither explicit nor implicit, and asserting the contrary is revisionist garbage at best, and a dangerous bit of anti-liberty propaganda at worst. Your right to be left the heck alone by government, unless it has a good and compelling and legal right to interfere, is not written down in the Constitution for reasons that are well set forth in the Declaration of Independence: because your right to liberty is NATURAL -- comes from your Creator, not ANY institution of man, be it king or Constitution or Congress or court of law -- and INALIENABLE -- meaning it cannot be taken from you by any force or color of law, nor even signed away by you voluntarily. It's as much yours as your arms and legs, and for the same reason. The reason this right is not written down in the Constitution, and the reason it is offensive to the idea of liberty and self-government for it to be "inferred" from the Constitution, is because if the right comes FROM the Constitution, it is necessarily limited BY the Constitution -- and can even be eliminated or changed beyond all recognition by amending the Constitution, or by institutions charged with interpreting the Constitution, such as courts. Why do you think the state gives you a drivers' license? Is it to recognize your inalienable right to drive? Certainly not. The state gives you a drivers' licence in order to LIMIT your right to drive, to reserve the power to take it away, modify it, circumscribe it. Anything licensed by the state is necessarily limitable by the state, and that is the only reason it's ever done. If your liberty is "licensed" by the state -- if it can be "inferred" from the Constitution -- then it is not natural, not inherent and inalienable, and the state can take it away whenever it chooses. (It may well require a majority vote, in Congress or in an election, to do so -- but that should, I hope, be very little comfort. What good is a right if it depends on the good will of the majority?)