OpenStudy (anonymous):

medal rewarded! are surface waves that cause rock to move horizontally without vertical displacement. A. Primary waves B. Secondary waves C. Rayleigh waves D. Love waves wouldnt it be love waves?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

look at this page http://www.vashonsd.wednet.edu/mcmurray/science/justin/gespdf_ans/c9/cr9.pdf it says that "love = vertical strong motion" on the first page, so love waves displace the rock vertically (it seems) so it's not love waves

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

so would it be B then?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

one sec

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

kk

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

here's a great site that shows the displacement of the earth/rock when each type of wave goes through http://www.geo.mtu.edu/UPSeis/waves.html

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

notice how 3 out of the 4 types produce an up and down movement

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

yep i notice it :) could you do me a favor? could you correct my answers of 10 questions about earthquakes?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

i'll give it a shot, but i'm no geologist or seismologist

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

lol okay, so then the first one would be B then correct?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

did you have a look at the pics?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

if so, then you would have seen that Secondary waves or S waves cause an up/down motion

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

P waves right, it said that p waves can only move through a solid rock

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

well that's true, but that's not what we're after

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

it says "P waves are also known as compressional waves" so you will only get horizontal displacement with P waves

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

but wouldnt that be what we want? because it says waves that cause rock to move horizontally without vertical displacement.

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

exactly, we don't want to move the rock up and down so that's why the answer is P waves

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

yay! lol

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

A scientist goes to a site that has been devastated by an earthquake. By observing around the epicenter of the quake, the scientist finds that very severe movement of the earth occurred. An earthquake like this one had not hit the area in approximately 300 years. Using the details described above, what was the likely magnitude of this earthquake on the Richter Scale? A. 1-2 B. 3-4 C. 5-6 D. 7-8 I got 6-7 as an asnwer

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

6-7 isn't even an answer choice

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

sorry i got that messed up, let me correct it A. 1-2 B. 3-4 C. 6-7 D. 8-9 sorry

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

im thinking 6-7 is as an answer

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

I'm thinking that 300 years is a very long time, so that would make me think that it's 8-9 because that's the largest magnitude given besides, 6-7 happens quite frequently annually (not in the same place everytime) that I don't think 6-7 magnitudes happen every 300 years

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

alright

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

but not 100% though

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

lol its oka

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

Which of the following is NOT an example of a seismic wave? A. Primary wave B. Secondary wave C. Surface wave D. Tertiary wave

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

I said D

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

i'm thinking that too, never ran into Tertiary wave in any of the sites i came across

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

Which of the following types of earthquakes can be caused by human activities? A. Explosion earthquakes B. Tectonic earthquakes C. Volcanic earthquakes D. None of the above

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

I think A @jim_thompson5910

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

A sounds good since humans are able to control explosions, but not volcanoes and such.

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

yep!

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

Where was the largest earthquake on Earth recorded? A. Alaska B. Chile C. Japan D. Hawaii I picked C japan

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

check out this page http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/world/events/1960_05_22.php

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

Japan is a good choice since there was a huge earthquake in 2011, but it wasn't the largest recorded

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

so chilli then right!:)

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

mmm chilli is always a good choice (now I'm hungry) lol jk

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

yep it's Chile

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

lol! im hungry too now that i think of it!!!!

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

lol sry, my bad

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

:)

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

Which scientist developed the scale used to measure the magnitude of an earthquake? A. Einstein B. Hess C. Richter D. Wegener

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

Richter!

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

you got it

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

An earthquake measuring 8.0 on the Richter Scale is _______ times stronger than an earthquake measuring 4.0 on the Richter Scale. A. 40 B. 100 C. 1,000 D. 10,000

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

100?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

I think a 6.0 is 10^1 times more powerful than a 5.0 (notice the exponent of 1 corresponds to the difference of 6-5 = 1) so a 8.0 is 10^4 = 10,000 times more powerful than a 4.0

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

that sounds about right

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

so 100 right or 1000?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

no i just said it above

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

10,000 right? or 100 lol

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

yep 10,000

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

idk where you're seeing 100

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

lol idk either hahah

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

The San Andreas Fault is an example of which fault type? A. Normal fault B. Strike-slip fault C. Reverse fault D. Thrust fault

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

getting tired i guess lol

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

strike slip right?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

yeah i'm getting the same as well

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

Which of the following types of earthquakes are the most common? A. Collapse earthquakes B. Explosion earthquakes C. Tectonic eathquakes D. Volcanic earthquakes

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

volcanic earthquakes?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

http://scign.jpl.nasa.gov/learn/eq2.htm

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

im soryy its tectonic

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

yep, that's ok, i had to look it up too

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

i guess volcanoes would be next, but i don't think volcanoes erupt that frequently as earthquakes happen

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

Which of the following is an example of a surface wave? A. Primary wave B. Secondary wave C. Rayleigh wave D. Tertiary wave

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

i got p waves

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surface_wave

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

In seismology, several types of surface waves are encountered. Surface waves, in this mechanical sense, are commonly known as either Love waves (L waves) or Rayleigh waves.

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

from that page i posted

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

C right?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

yep

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

yay! 90% thanks:) first one was wrong

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

which one was that

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

that was this one i thought was love waves

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

oh so it was love waves? guess that pic i found was wrong, but idk

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

lol thanks so much!

4 years ago
OpenStudy (jim_thompson5910):

you're welcome

4 years ago
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