OpenStudy (anonymous):

if the charge of a proton is \[e\] and the charge of the electron is \[-e\] and the fundamental unit of electric charge is \[e=2.6\times 10^{-19} \textrm{Coulombs} \] Sooo......is the fundamental unit of electric charge different for protons and electron? so would the fundamental charge of an electron be \[-e=-2.6 \times 10^{-19} \textrm{Coulombs} \]

4 years ago
OpenStudy (abb0t):

Proton's have positive charge. Electrons have negative charge.

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

I understand that. I was wondering in terms of coulombs law....that long definition of fundamental units I wrote...

4 years ago
OpenStudy (abb0t):

Oh man, I totally forgot electricity! Gotta think way back to freshman year... I think there's a formula. It's something like k(Qq)/q? I think. I cant read your question by the way. Lol.

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

is the fundamental unit of charge specific to protons since "e" is written positively?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

try refreshing the page...the question should be legible now

4 years ago
OpenStudy (abb0t):

You might want to ask this in the physics section, under electricity & magnetism to get the best explanation. I would have to review a bit before i could give provide you with a definite answer for this :/ Lol

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

that's ok LOL...yeah I'll keep asking around

4 years ago
OpenStudy (abb0t):

Sorry about that. I'll see if I still have my notes on my computer for electricity and if I do find something I'l definitely help you out. Cheers.

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

thanks @abb0t :)

4 years ago
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