OpenStudy (anonymous):

can someone help me graph sin(2x-pi/3)?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

could you help me out with this problem?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

you still there?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

http://math.ucsd.edu/~wgarner/math10a/triggraphs.htm see figure 3 and move the curve by pi/3

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

ok

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

the period is changed to pi because of the 2x, right?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

yes

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

ok

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

so

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

ehh

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

I move the coordinates (0,0) to the left by pi/3?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

you still there?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

i think it should be moved by right use (pi/6,0)

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

why pi/6?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

I understand how to graph (2x

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

but is there a way to annonate 2x-pi/3?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

like can you annonate the points on the graph with pi over whatever or do you have to write the points in decimal numbers for 2x-pi/3?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

because at y=1, x= approximately -.856

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

I don't know how to write that in pi/ whatever

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

or is it not necessary to annonate in terms of pi for that particular problem?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

i use pi more often... both are fine i think

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

but if I were to write it in pi, how would I know when it came to a problem like 2x-pi/3?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

when i draw the graph i use it because it's clear and more straightforward

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

2x-pi/3=0 and when this happens sin2x=sin0=0

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

hmm...

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

I'm trying to think here...

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

so, would the period still be pi?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

and would each of the points be in terms of like pi/6?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

so you would have like 12 points?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

yep it's just an assumption. makes it easier for me to visualize the graph

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

ok, that makes sense

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

you think it is necessary to annonate?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

sorry, what are points?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

coordinates

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

in a graph

4 years ago
OpenStudy (zpupster):

4 years ago
OpenStudy (zpupster):

as he said 2x then move pi/3 to the right

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

exactly

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

the second graph has less humps

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

the first one had 6 while the second one has half as much

4 years ago
OpenStudy (zpupster):

that is called compression

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

because of 2x?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

would the period also change to pi or do I have to worry about that?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (zpupster):

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

yeah it's has twice more waves

4 years ago
OpenStudy (zpupster):

look at sin x and sin 2x

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

so do I move the graph pi/3 to the right?

4 years ago
OpenStudy (zpupster):

yes just like the first graph i showed

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

that's what happens to the -pi/3 part

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

sorry if i am so clueless, I just have a teacher that has major trouble speaking English, and I took Trigonometry online where I couldn't really ask questions :(. I would probably learn about more if I had teachers like you guys.

4 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

cool you learned it online

4 years ago
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