OpenStudy (anonymous):

What is the history and impact of Islam in Africa?

3 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

Some of the most developed parts of the world got united in one state by the 8th century (Egypt, Syria, Persia), combining the sciences and arts of all these nations, translating Greek texts, the prosperous financial status, and caring for science by the rulers, resulted in a rich culture and a lot of advancement and new achievements in medicine, mathematics etc. In Greater Syria, Some Semetic languages disappeared or almost disappeared such as Aramic In Egypt people were speaking Coptic and were dominantly Christian of course, they did not adhere to Islam, People converted really gradually and slowly. (Till 17th Century some were still speaking Coptic, and by 13th Century only 30 percent had converted to Islam).

3 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

@david111 you are a life saver can you help me with one more ?

3 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

sure

3 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

Foreign aid or (development assistance) is often regarded as being too much, or wasted on corrupt recipient governments despite any good intentions from donor countries. In reality, both the quantity and quality of aid have been poor and donor nations have not been held to account. There are numerous forms of aid, from humanitarian emergency assistance, to food aid, military assistance, etc. Development aid has long been recognized as crucial to help poor developing nations grow out of poverty. In 1970, the world’s rich countries agreed to give 0.7% of their GNI (Gross National Income) as official international development aid, annually. Since that time, despite billions given each year, rich nations have rarely met their actual promised targets. For example, the US is often the largest donor in dollar terms, but ranks amongst the lowest in terms of meeting the stated 0.7% target. Furthermore, aid has often come with a price of its own for the developing nations: Aid is often wasted on conditions that the recipient must use overpriced goods and services from donor countries Most aid does not actually go to the poorest who would need it the most Aid amounts are dwarfed by rich country protectionism that denies market access for poor country products, while rich nations use aid as a lever to open poor country markets to their products Large projects or massive grand strategies often fail to help the vulnerable as money can often be embezzled away.

3 years ago
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