OpenStudy (anonymous):

What is the mass number of the particle emitted from the nucleus during a beta minus decay?

3 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

id no much .... but ill tell you what i do know

3 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

In nuclear physics, beta decay is a type of radioactive decay in which a proton is transformed into a neutron, or vice versa, inside an atomic nucleus. This process allows the atom to move closer to the optimal ratio of protons and neutrons. As a result of this transformation, the nucleus emits a detectable beta particle, which is an electron or positron.

3 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

An example of electron emission is the decay of carbon-14 into nitrogen-14: 14 6C → 14 7N + e− + ν e

3 years ago
OpenStudy (sidsiddhartha):

mass number is unchanged for most cases

3 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

This new element has an unchanged mass number A but an atomic number Z that is increased by one. As in all nuclear decays, the decaying element (in this case 14 6C) is known as the parent nuclide while the resulting element (in this case 14 7N) is known as the daughter nuclide.

3 years ago
OpenStudy (sidsiddhartha):

like this |dw:1412786674610:dw|

3 years ago
Similar Questions: