OpenStudy (anonymous):

Often only small amounts of DNA are found at a crime scene. Which technique uses an enzyme to replicate DNA regions from a small sample of DNA for use in DNA fingerprinting? VNTRs (variable tandem repeats) PCR (polymerase chain reaction) analysis STRs (short tandem repeats) mtDNA (mitochondrial DNA) analysis

2 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

umm what do u think

2 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

no sure thats why im asking haha

2 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search This article is about DNA profiling in forensics. For other uses, see DNA profiling (disambiguation). For DNA testing for inherited diseases, see Genetic testing. Not to be confused with DNA barcoding or DNA Phenotyping. Forensic science Physiological sciences Forensic anthropology Forensic archaeology Forensic odontology Forensic entomology Forensic pathology Forensic botany Forensic biology DNA profiling Bloodstain pattern analysis Forensic chemistry Forensic osteology Forensic dentistry Social sciences Forensic psychology Forensic psychiatry Forensic criminalistics Ballistics Ballistic fingerprinting Body identification Fingerprint analysis Forensic accounting Forensic arts Forensic footwear evidence Forensic toxicology Gloveprint analysis Palmprint analysis Questioned document examination Vein matching Digital forensics Computer forensics Forensic data analysis Database forensics Mobile device forensics Network forensics Forensic video Forensic audio Related disciplines Fire investigation Fire accelerant detection Forensic engineering Forensic linguistics Forensic materials engineering Forensic polymer engineering Forensic statistics Forensic taphonomy Vehicular accident reconstruction People William M. Bass George W. Gill Richard Jantz Edmond Locard Douglas W. Owsley Werner Spitz Auguste Ambroise Tardieu Juan Vucetich Related articles Crime scene CSI effect Perry Mason syndrome Pollen calendar Skid mark Trace evidence Use of DNA in forensic entomology v· t· e Forensic DNA profiling (also called DNA testing or DNA typing) is a technique employed by forensic scientists to identify individuals by characteristics of their DNA. DNA profiles are a small set of DNA variations that are very likely to be different in all unrelated individuals. DNA profiling should not be confused with full genome sequencing.[1] DNA profiling is used in, for example, parentage testing and criminal investigation. Although 99.9% of human DNA sequences are the same in every person, enough of the DNA is different that it is possible to distinguish one individual from another, unless they are monozygotic twins.[2] DNA profiling uses repetitive ("repeat") sequences that are highly variable,[2] called variable number tandem repeats (VNTRs), in particular short tandem repeats (STRs). VNTR loci are very similar between closely related humans, but are so variable that unrelated individuals are extremely unlikely to have the same VNTRs. The DNA profiling technique was first reported in 1986[3] by Sir Alec Jeffreys at the University of Leicester in England, United Kingdom,[4] and is now the basis of several national DNA databases. Dr. Jeffreys' genetic fingerprinting was made commercially available in 1987, when a chemical company, Imperial Chemical Industries (ICI), started a blood-testing center in the U.K

2 years ago
OpenStudy (aaronq):

polymerase chain reaction It's a chain reaction in which the original sequence is copied in an exponential manner (\(2^n\) where n is the number of cycles) to generate more DNA for easier analysis. |dw:1421951420188:dw| watch this 15 min video for further explanation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yYIZgS-L5Sc

2 years ago
OpenStudy (djedwin):

Is not VNTRs (variable tandem repeats)

2 years ago
OpenStudy (djedwin):

B. PCR (polymerase chain reaction) analysis

2 years ago
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