OpenStudy (anonymous):

Can somebody check my answers? 1. ¿Cuál frase es correcta? a) ¡Cómpralo! b) ¡Lo compra! <- my answer c) ¡Compralo! 2. ¿Cuál frase es correcta? a) ¡No lo cómpres! b) ¡No lo cómpras! c) ¡No lo compres! d) ¡No lo compra! <- my answer

2 years ago
OpenStudy (ichliebedich):

1. wrong 2.wrong

2 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

1. a 2. c

2 years ago
OpenStudy (ichliebedich):

1 is right 2 isn't

2 years ago
OpenStudy (ichliebedich):

the answers are a and a

2 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

Both are letter A

2 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

There are five comments before mine. Two of them gave you a correct response.

2 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

@ichliebedich Negative comments in Spanish don't use accent marks.

2 years ago
OpenStudy (alfonso-o):

Hello there! If I may join in, here are some ideas... - As for question 1: Remember that when an imperative (command) is in the affirmative form, pronouns usually are attached to the verb (so it's spelled as only ONE word). Example: *Damelo* [with accent on *a*] [da + me + lo = damelo] (= "Give me that.") In the case of *damelo*, accent is on *a* because of Spanish spelling rules: words with stress on the antepenultimate (third from last) syllable get an accent on that very syllable. ========= - As for question 2: As you can guess, pronouns are NOT attached to the verb when commands are in the negative form. Also, we use the subjunctive (*subjuntivo*) rather than an imperative as such. Here's the present Subjunctive for COMPRAR: (yo) -- compre (tu) -- compres (el/ ella/ Ud.) -- compre (nosotros/ nosotras) -- compremos (vosotros/ vosotras) -- compreis [with accent on *e*] (ellos/ ellas/ Uds.) -- compren And finally: why do *compres*, *compras*, and *compra* get NO accent: This is also because of Spanish spelling rules: a word with stress on the penultimate (last but one) syllable gets NO accent if that word ends in: vowel -n, or -s Hope this helps! Blessings P.S.: Sorry I can't include accents from my computer: they won't show correctly.

2 years ago
OpenStudy (ichliebedich):

@inyourhead they do, my main language is spanish so i know how to write words, they do have accents

2 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

@ichliebedich Positive "tu" commands have accents. Negative ones don't. (They have accents in the vosotros form.) Here are five different pages that explain positive and negative "tu" commands. None of them tell us to use accents in negative "tu" commands. http://www.spanishdict.com/topics/show/66 http://spanishnotebook.com/negativetucommands.html https://conjuguemos.com/chart.php?language=spanish&id=27&etre=no&commands=yes&source=public&all=no http://www.drlemon.com/Grammar/tu-command.html http://www.cliffsnotes.com/foreign-languages/spanish/spanish-i/commands/tu-commands Spanish isn't my native language. But in all six years that I've studied it, we never attached accents to negative "tu" commands.

2 years ago
OpenStudy (alfonso-o):

Hello there! I agree that none of the verb forms in exercise 2 (negative *tu* commands [*tu* with accent on *u*]) have accents. :) Now, if we'd like to know why, here's the reason: What happens is these kinds of commands end in -s, and, at the same time, the stress falls on the last but one syllable. The result is this: that (last but one) syllable cannot be accented -- i.e. those words are not accented. Hope this helps in some way! Blessings

2 years ago
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