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MACBETH, aside. The… - QuestionCove
OpenStudy (anonymous):

MACBETH, aside. The Prince of Cumberland! that is a step On which I must fall down, or else o'erleap, For in my way it lies. Stars, hide your fires; Let not light see my black and deep desires: The eye wink at the hand; yet let that be, Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act I, scene iv What future event does this passage foreshadow? A. Macbeth becoming Prince of Cumberland B. The king killing Macbeth C. Macbeth killing Malcolm D. Macbeth killing the king

2 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

@mjparrish @Missiey @M3GA-BIT3 @FitzIncorporated @zarkam21 @dehelloo @wonderland_11 @nevermind_justschool @brandi03 @PrincestonA @darkdirl111296 @raymonde20

2 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

D or C. He doesn't do A or B.

2 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

what do you think about D?

2 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

C

2 years ago
OpenStudy (anonymous):

Yeah, I'm thinking D, but it'd be wise to check.

2 years ago
OpenStudy (dehelloo):

Yeah sure its D but do you understand why?

2 years ago
OpenStudy (dehelloo):

What Macbeth is asking for here is impossible. He would like the stars to go out (Stars hide your fears) so that no one can see what he wants, not even himself (Let not light see my black and deep desires). He asks that his own eye wink, or go blind, so that his eye cannot see what it is that his hand wishes or desires to do (The eye wink at the hand;). The final part of the quote is saying that he wants to just wants to let it be even though he knows that his own eye will be afraid to look at what it is that he's done (yet let that be. Which the eye fears, when it is done to see).

2 years ago
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