AngeI:

Please help

2 weeks ago
AngeI:

1. Read the excerpt of the poem. Then answer the question. excerpt from “Paul Revere’s Ride” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow It was twelve by the village clock, When he crossed the bridge into Medford town. He heard the crowing of the Orange, And the barking of the farmer’s dog, And felt the damp of the river fog, That rises after the sun goes down. It was one by the village clock, When he galloped into Lexington. He saw the gilded weathercock Swim in the moonlight as he passed, And the meeting-house windows, blank and bare, Gaze at him with a spectral glare, As if they already stood aghast At the bloody work they would look upon. It was two by the village clock, When he came to the bridge in Concord town. He heard the bleating of the flock, And the twitter of birds among the trees, And felt the breath of the morning breeze Blowing over the meadows brown. And one was safe and asleep in his bed Who at the bridge would be the first to fall, Who that day would be lying dead, Pierced by a British musket ball. You know the rest. In the books you have read, How the British Regulars fired and fled,— How the farmers gave them ball for ball, From behind each fence and farm-yard wall, Chasing the red-coats down the lane, Then crossing the fields to emerge again Under the trees at the turn of the road, And only pausing to fire and load. So through the night rode Paul Revere; And so through the night went his cry of alarm To every Middlesex village and farm,— A cry of defiance and not of fear, A voice in the darkness, a knock at the door, And a word that shall echo forevermore! For, borne on the night-wind of the Past, Through all our history, to the last, In the hour of darkness and peril and need, The people will awaken and listen to hear The hurrying hoof-beats of that steed, And the midnight message of Paul Revere. What is a central idea of this excerpt of "Paul Revere's Ride"? How does the structure of the poem help to develop this central idea? Use evidence from the text to support your response. Your response should be at least two complete paragraphs.

2 weeks ago
AngeI:

@Elsa213 im sorry i know its alot ;~;

2 weeks ago
AngeI:

I know the central idea is how Paul Revere warned people about how the British troops were coming

2 weeks ago
Elsa213:

Dey pewpewpew Lemme re-read doe <.<

2 weeks ago
AngeI:

oki lol

2 weeks ago
Elsa213:

Okayy~ What stanzas help you understand the central idea?

2 weeks ago
AngeI:

So through the night rode Paul Revere; And so through the night went his cry of alarm

2 weeks ago
Elsa213:

2 paragraphs? ;-;

2 weeks ago
AngeI:

ikr ;~;, you dont have to help though cx

2 weeks ago
Elsa213:

I will, though. <.<

2 weeks ago
AngeI:

dont you dun Elsa its oki cx

2 weeks ago
Shadow:

You have the central idea correct, you just need to back it up with referencing the structure and lines of the poem. Somewhere you can start is that the poem provides structure through time. "It was twelve by the village clock, It was one by the village clock, It was two by the village clock," Through this it provides details for specific intervals of time that night, and follows Revere as the night goes on. Such details are the sounds being heard during the ride: "He heard the crowing of the Orange, And the barking of the farmer’s dog," The sensation of the air: "And felt the damp of the river fog," The scenery: "He saw the gilded weathercock Swim in the moonlight as he passed, And the meeting-house windows, blank and bare, Gaze at him with a spectral glare, As if they already stood aghast At the bloody work they would look upon." This section in particular not only provides visual details but gives the gravity (or importance) of the ride.

2 weeks ago
AngeI:

Ah ok thank you shadows cx

2 weeks ago
Shadow:

The central idea is of Paul Revere and the ride that he taking. But our author, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, wishes to create an American legend out of him. This is why he imbues the importance of the ride into the poem. He wants this to be a poem that inspires, and shows what the patriots of this new land are like. "So through the night rode Paul Revere; And so through the night went his cry of alarm To every Middlesex village and farm,— A cry of defiance and not of fear," The origins of America lie in defiance. To the British Empire, who did not represent it's people. Then to try and reclaim the people that left them as their own colonies. "A voice in the darkness, a knock at the door, And a word that shall echo forevermore! For, borne on the night-wind of the Past, Through all our history, to the last," Again, this shows the intention of Longfellow for this to be a historic and inspirational poem for the generations to come, and hear.

2 weeks ago
HuskyNation:

e.e too long am out

2 weeks ago
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