envision:

What is a good example of Cues in psychology?

2 weeks ago
Ultrilliam:

@Shadow

2 weeks ago
Shadow:

Are you referring to visual cues?

2 weeks ago
envision:

Well, it was only named "cues" on my assignment. It didn't have a particular cue.

2 weeks ago
Shadow:

Could I get more information as to what your assignment pertains to?

2 weeks ago
envision:

Well basically, I just need a tip on how using cues can help a freshman.

2 weeks ago
Shadow:

I assume for studying?

2 weeks ago
Shadow:

In such a case, the cues we would be referring to are retrieval cues. They are essentially events that can be both internal, and external, and can help us with memory perception and recollection.

2 weeks ago
envision:

Do you have a tip of how a freshman can use cues that could help them throughout their first high school experience?

2 weeks ago
Shadow:

One that I use throughout my academic studies is mnemonic devices. It's a method of learning in which you associate a verbal cue (word, phrase, or even a whistle) with something in order to recall it. It's an effective memory aid, and I first learned about it from a prolific Ted video in which you can watch it in action. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e4PTvXtz4GM He explains some things started at 11:20, then starts using mnemonic devices at around 14minutes.

2 weeks ago
Shadow:

The association that the person makes between the mnemonic device and the information the person wants to recall does not need to be logical, or understandable to anyone else. It just has to make sense to the person, in order to properly recall the information. A personal example that I actually employed in my freshman year of high school was in biology class. For one of the terms in a long list of vocabulary and terminology, I associated a specific term with my sisters name (since they sounded similar). Then I drew a correlation between traits of that biology term, and my sister. Thus when the test came, and I needed to remember the traits of the biology term, I would first recall my sisters name, her traits, then the correlations I drew between her traits and the term's traits. It sounds confusing, and long, but it worked effectively for me.

2 weeks ago
Shadow:

In my concept and vocab heavy classes, before tests I often create short stories in my mind in order to recall concepts/vocab. You can use even use people/objects in the classroom, which practically turns into a cheat card. More than once I have remember a question I would have missed, simply by glancing at a classmate (though not actually cheating). This is the power of memory association.

2 weeks ago
envision:

Thanks so much. All of this information is very helpful xD

2 weeks ago
Shadow:

No problem. I would highly recommend it's implementation in your studying habits.

2 weeks ago
Similar Questions: